My concerns for the rights of my fellow Americans

I marched because I wanted to hold a candle to the many issues clouding our American government.  I marched because I came of age in the presidency of Barack Obama, who taught me about hope, optimism, grace, and democracy.  I marched because of Hillary Rodham Clinton, whose unapologetic intelligence, toughness, and perseverance has inspired me since I was a high schooler in a small town where no one cared about politics.  I marched because I’m grateful for the rights I do have as an American citizen–and how I’ve never felt as patriotic as I felt on my first Election Day morning, casting my first vote for president for a woman (and knowing how much that moment would mean to my mother, my grandmother, and my 105-year-old great-grandmother).  I marched because all of the people above have inspired me to attend law school in the future and I wanted to view this nation’s democracy at work.  I marched because I’m worried for the future of our world.  I marched for myself and my rights as a woman, but my concerns about my own rights are heavily outweighed by my concerns for the rights of my fellow Americans.  I marched for every woman I know, women and people of color (because BLACK LIVES MATTER!!!!), for trans women whose existence is ignored far too often by feminists and others alike, for immigrants whose existence alone is a positive contribution to the framework of this nation, for Muslims who shouldn’t have to live in fear, for everyone I know who is LGBTQ+ (because LOVE IS LOVE IS LOVE), for the water protectors and to say NO to DAPL, for our planet because science is real, for the rights of people with disabilities, for an end to systemic gun violence, mass incarcerations and police brutality, to save our nation’s healthcare, for a free press, for the refugees who just need a hand, and for everyone who makes up this already great nation, even those who believe a Women’s March and protesting are unnecessary.  I marched because I may be young now, but someday I’ll have grandchildren.  I marched because someday they will ask me how I could have let such backwards, hateful rhetoric happen.  I marched because I want to be able to say to them with my whole heart and without misgivings, “I didn’t.”