I’m Terrified of the Future.

I marched in tiny Loup City, NE (population 1,000), my hometown, because I am appalled at the lack of respect for women, people of color, LGBTQ persons, the disabled, and the poor that I have seen coming from the new administration.  I marched because I believe Nebraskans are fair and kind people, many of whom have been misled about the real threats to humanity.  Those misleading stories have made many afraid and suspicious of their neighbors and strangers, and marching together can show them that we have nothing to fear but that fear and suspicion.  I marched because the Midwest has been painted as an intolerant, backward, and ignorant section of the country, and that is simply not true.  When we join together in love, truth, and acceptance, we show the rest of the nation that their perceptions of the Midwest are not accurate.  I marched because those of us who hold those beliefs are not represented well by our elected officials, who need to know how many of us do not fall in line with the racist, homophobic, misogynistic, and xenophobic views that are expressed as examples of how citizens of the United States feel. I marched because I am terrified of what the future holds for my young granddaughters if we do not turn this country back to the loving and accepting land that I love.

I Marched for All Women

I marched for all women. Of all races, color, religion, backgrounds, and sexuality. We are all equal. So are men. And our children. I participated in the Women’s March because of my concerns on President Trump and his administration. But I’m hopeful and I support democracy. At the end of the day, we are all on the same team.

I support a woman’s right to her own body.

I support Science, those brilliant minds collecting data on climate change and studying weather patterning, who are trying to preserve this great world and all the creatures for future generations.

I support the hard-working, underpaid journalists that spend every waking hour to report the news, unbiased, to us. They spend hours away from their families, holidays and weekends for work, they dig and go further than most, their actions have integrity and merit. We need journalists. They are often not liked and berated. But the good ones, we need to support. Local and national.

I marched for love. I support the men who love women. I support the women who love women, and the men who love men.

I marched for my son. I will spend the rest of my life bringing up my son to be an informed, educated gentleman who treats everyone with respect.

We want truth, not lies

I marched for my 91-year young Mother who fought the fight so that I, as a woman,  can enjoy the rights and freedom I have today.  My Mother has worked since I was four and past the age of 65.  Today she is on Medicare and forced Medicaid.  I am worried about what is to become of these programs.
I marched for transparency.   We demand to see Donald Trump’s Tax Returns and business interests.
I marched because everyone is equal in the eyes of our Lord.
I marched for truth; not lies.
I marched for Planned Parenthood and the good it does and has done for women and men.
I marched because I am Pro-choice.   I have two beautiful adopted boys because their birth mother chose life out of love, not because she was forced to.
I marched because I am scared to death about the direction our Country is taking under this President and his unqualified Cabinet and staff.  We are becoming a Country of hatred, racism, white supremacy, and fear.
I marched because I have the freedom to do so and will continue to march so that this freedom is not taken away.

Because I love our country

I marched because I love our country, and I value truth and freedom. Not even a week into his term, our new President has lied repeatedly; denied the press access to him and his administration; has silenced entities and organizations that disagree with him; is frighteningly unable to discern between the trivial and the important when attacking those who disagree with him (and he personally attacks citizens of the United States who disagree with him); and is destroying advances we’ve made in women’s/immigrants’/minorities’ rights, religious freedom, science education, affordable health care, environmental issues, and equality issues facing minorities. I value what rights we have in this country, and I’d like to preserve and expand them–not contract them. Women’s rights need to continue to grow and expand, and I believe the current President will not only fail to advance women’s issues (access to affordable health care and services, equal pay for equal work, affordable/reliable child care, educate legislative bodies/judges/attorneys about the rape culture in our society that gives the perpetrator every advantage, and many others), he’ll turn back the clock on the painstaking progress we’ve made.

Stand up for justice and truth

I asked myself and others “why march?” many times before actually deciding to do it. After the election I was shocked, upset, disconnected, angry, sad and just generally overwhelmed and unsure of how to proceed. A march sounded good. But I wasn’t sure it would address the responsibility I felt to my children, my family, my community and my country to address the consequences of the presidential election. I wanted to stand up for justice and truth – but I wasn’t sure if a march would make a lasting difference. Marching might make me feel better, but would my energy and effort be better spent elsewhere? Ultimately I decided to march. I marched because I believe it is important to treat all people with respect. I believe in the Constitution and the freedoms that come with it. I care about people with disabilities. I marched for the many women in our country who know first-hand about sexual assault and sexual harassment, and specifically for those women who bravely told their truths during the election for the entire world to hear and then watched as their country elected him anyway. I marched because I believe immigrants and refugees have made and will continue to make our country strong. I marched because I want my elected officials to know that I value equal rights for ALL. I marched because I am worried about how the policies of the new administration will impact healthcare, the rights of the LGBT community, women, immigrants, the environment and education. I marched because I’m scared and because I care deeply. Now more than ever I want to be an active and engaged citizen. For me that means marching, writing my elected officials, praying, thinking, reading, and staying engaged. I commit to all that. And I will never again think twice again about marching. It was one of the more positive, cathartic, and energizing things I have done.